3-2 discussion: make your case

A Guardian reporter, speaking about England, wrote: “Anyone going to jail in this country has to adapt to a cynical, corrupt, antisocial lifestyle which does little to encourage change in post-prison behaviour” (James, 2015). This quote implies that prison culture is notably different from the culture at large, and though it speaks specifically of England, we can apply it to U.S. culture as well.

To learn more about the prison lifestyle, also known as the convict code, view this video: The Convict Code (8:55)

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Take a position. Do you agree or disagree that the convict code differs significantly from our culture’s moral code?

First, title your initial post either “The convict code reflects our culture’s moral code” or “The convict code does not reflect our culture’s moral code.”

Then, using the information from the resource above as well as from your weekly readings, make your case. Consider the following:

  • What do you see as the key elements of the convict code in prison culture?
  • What are the key elements of our culture’s moral code? Are there differences as well as similarities?
  • Do some subcultures of the United States reflect the convict code more closely than others?

In response to your peers, consider their arguments and describe whether you agree or disagree with them. Consider the following:

  • Are there parts of their arguments that you agree with? If so, which ones? If not, which parts do you disagree with? Be specific.
  • Is there something that your peers said that made you reevaluate your position, even slightly?

To complete this assignment, review the Discussion Rubric.

References

James, E. (2015, November 9). We don’t need new prisons, we need a new prison culture. The Guardian. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/nov/09/prisons-prison-culture-detainees-crime-jails