Applied sciences to prepare for this capstone assignment-draft mini

 

As you continue in your professional career, you will have many opportunities to learn through interacting with your peers. This week, you will complete Assignment 3-the first draft of your Mini Literature Review and share it with your colleagues. Next week, you will offer feedback on your colleagues’ work. Be sure to think about how to communicate your feedback in a professional and constructive manner.

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RESOURCES

 

To prepare for this Capstone Assignment-Draft Mini Literature Review:

  1. Finish writing your Draft Mini Literature Review that you began last week and submit it by Day 7 to both the Week 4/5 Capstone Project Discussion Forum and Week 4 Project link (Your draft literature review should be submitted twice-in these 2 different areas)
  2. Read the Peer Feedback Rubric provided in the Learning Resources. Be prepared to use the rubric to guide your critique of your classmates’ Mini Literature Reviews. This will be submitted next week (by Day 2 of Week 5)

 You will upload your Draft Mini Literature Review to the Week 4 Project submission link and also to the Week 4/5 Capstone Project Discussion Forum on the next page. (Your draft literature review should be uploaded in both of these places.) 

Capstone Project: Annotated Bibliography

Nadine Teasley

Walden University

Capstone

July 26, 2023

Capstone Project: Annotated Bibliography

Capstone Project Topic

Behavioral and Historical Factors That Contribute To Resistance to Vaccination among the African Americans in the United States

Annotated Bibliography

Dubé, È. Ward, J. K., Verger, P., & MacDonald, N. E. (2021). Vaccine hesitancy, acceptance, and anti-vaccination: trends and prospects for public health. Annu Rev Public Health, 42(1), 175–91.

The article’s authors assert that vaccination is a victim of its success. They noted that many people see vaccines as unnecessary and unsafe despite scientific evidence pointing the contrary. In 2019, the World Health Organization categorized vaccine resistance as one of the ten threats to global health. Anti-vaccination crusaders have been identified as the cause of increased resistance to vaccination. 

The article findings are important to my study because they present a non-racial overview of vaccine resistance among different communities. The authors explain the causes, consequences, and impacts of vaccination resistance to global health. The authors also conducted a literature review to highlight the gaps in the current knowledge on why people resist vaccination drives. 

Jamison, A. M., Quinn, S. C., & Freimuth, V. S. (2019). “You do not trust a government vaccine”: Narratives of institutional trust and influenza vaccination among African American and white adults. Social Science & Medicine, pp. 221, 87–94.

The article’s authors assert that confidence in vaccines highly relies on people’s trust in the vaccine and those who manufacture the vaccines. The authors reviewed the accounts of whites and black people on their trust in the people and systems managing vaccines. Data focused on influenza vaccine disparities between white and black adults. Findings indicate that many people, especially black, distrust vaccine manufacturing. 

The article’s findings are relevant to my project as they highlight some political and social issues that instigate the black community’s resistance or go slow on vaccinations. Black people do not trust government institutions and their motives when promoting vaccination drives. People opt to use vaccines because they trust the vaccine and the systems that handle it. 

Laurencin, C.T. (2021). Addressing Justified Vaccine Hesitancy in the Black Community. J. Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities 8, 543–546. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-021-01025-4

The author of the article is of the view that the impacts of COVID-19 have been felt by people all over the world. However, the author feels that racism synonymous with the American healthcare system will significantly impact the black community as they are likely to hold on to their vaccination hesitancy instigated by racism and social injustices in American society. The author argues that vaccine hesitancy will perpetuate health disparities reflected in rising infections and deaths in the black community. 

This article is relevant to my study as it will provide literature and knowledge on social factors that promote vaccination hesitancy among people of color. Similarly, the author provides rich knowledge on vaccination hesitancy among people of color. 

Moore, J. X., Gilbert, K. L., Lively, K. L., Laurent, C., Chawla, R., Li, C., … & Ledford, C. J. (2021). Correlates of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among a community sample of African Americans living in the Southern United States. Vaccines, 9(8), 879.

African Americans have been affected lopsidedly by COVID-19 mortality in America. However, the authors are of the view that African Americans who are highly impacted will be hesitant to accept vaccination compared to non-Hispanic whites. The authors focused on investigating factors linked to vaccine resistance among African Americans. Findings indicate that young people are more likely to be hesitant about vaccines than older people in the black community. Again, people who have experienced housing insecurity will likely not accept vaccination. 

The current study is significant to my project as it provides information on some de demographics contributing to resistance among African Americans. Similarly, the study shows the disparities between black community vaccine acceptances compared and non-Hispanic whites, issues that deter African Americans from accepting vaccines. 

Okoro, O., Kennedy, J., Simmons, G., Vosen, E. C., Allen, K., Singer, D., & Roberts, R. (2021). Exploring the scope and dimensions of vaccine hesitancy and resistance to enhance COVID-19 vaccination in Black communities. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, pp. 1–14.

The authors noted that the black community has a long history of distrust between the American medical community and government institutions. The article’s author assessed the black community’s willingnessOVID-19 shots amid the distrust that has instigated vaccine hesitancy in the community. The study focused on black community members’ perception of the coronavirus vaccine. Results indicate that 37.1% of black people hesitated to take the short while 34% were willing to take the shot. 

The study is relevant to my study as it resents factors that contributed to hesitancy among African American Americans. Hesitancy to vaccination drive among people of color is based on the historical distrust between the government institutions and the black community. The study will provide historical factors that instigate vaccine hesitancy among African Americans. 

Quinn, S. C., Hilyard, K. M., Jamison, A. M., Ann, J., Hancock, G. R., Musa, D., & Freimuth, V. S. (2017). The influence of social norms on flu vaccination among African American and White adults. Health education research, 32(6), 473–486.

The article’s authors noted that influenza vaccination remains low, especially among the black community. Social norms held by people have a direct influence on vaccination behaviors. However, little research has focused on racial-specific norms that influence vaccination behaviors. Subjective norms were revealed to support vaccination-positive behaviors in both white and black communities. 

It is apparent from the study that vaccination hesitancy is high in the African American community because many people or families are not willing to discuss vaccination subject. Because of this, subjective norms supporting vaccination are not common among black families. The study is relevant to my project as it will provide knowledge on how social norms can be used to break the hesitancy to vaccination or enhance vaccination refusal among people of color.  

Wagner, C. E., Prentice, J. A., Saad-Roy, C. M., Yang, L., Grenfell, B. T., Levin, S. A., & Laxminarayan, R. (2020). Economic and behavioral influencers of vaccination and antimicrobial use. Frontiers in Public Health, pp. 8, 975.

The authors of the articles believe world that are experiencing enhanced vaccination efforts, but they are faced with great resistance and hesitancy globally. The high re, refusal, and hesitancy rate is likely to impact the COVID-19 vaccination drive globally. The authors noted that vaccine resistance in the body has been alleviated by the frequent use of antibiotics, especially among young people. The authors investigate why the use of antibiotics is accepted universally while the use of vaccines is controversial. 

The findings of this study are important to my project as they provide a global view of vaccine resistance, refusal, and hesitancy. The findings will enhance the generalization of the study findings because they do not fall to a specific country, community, or race but to all people worldwide. Similarly, the study will provide knowledge on economic factors instigating refusal and hesitancy to vaccination. 

Woko, C., Siegel, L., & Hornik, R. (2020). An investigation of low COVID-19 vaccination intentions among Black Americans: The role of behavioral beliefs and trust in COVID-19 information sources. Journal of Health Communication, 25(10), 819-826.

The article’s authors noted that combatting the COVID-19 pandemic gained a huge boost after developing the vaccine. However, they noted that the success of the vaccination drive will depend on the willingness of the people to take the shot. The authors noted that historical vaccination accounts do not favor the black community going for the shot, although it has been impacted by the pandemic more than any other community in America. The authors investigated how trust and sources of information on the vaccine impaired people from going for vaccination.

The source is relevant to my project because it is apparent from the findings that sources of information on the vaccine deter the willingness of the people to accept the vaccine and are highest among African Americans compared to other communities. This implies that vaccine a lack of trust in the vaccines and the sources of information on the vaccines.

References

Dubé, È. Ward, J. K., Verger, P., & MacDonald, N. E. (2021). Vaccine hesitancy, acceptance, and anti-vaccination: trends and prospects for public health. Annu Rev Public Health, 42(1), 175–91.

Jamison, A. M., Quinn, S. C., & Freimuth, V. S. (2019). “You do not trust a government vaccine”: Narratives of institutional trust and influenza vaccination among African American and white adults. Social Science & Medicine, pp. 221, 87–94.

Laurencin, C.T. (2021). Addressing Justified Vaccine Hesitancy in the Black Community. J. Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities 8, 543–546. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-021-01025-4

Moore, J. X., Gilbert, K. L., Lively, K. L., Laurent, C., Chawla, R., Li, C., … & Ledford, C. J. (2021). Correlates of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among a community sample of African Americans living in the Southern United States. Vaccines, 9(8), 879.

Okoro, O., Kennedy, J., Simmons, G., Vosen, E. C., Allen, K., Singer, D., & Roberts, R. (2021). Exploring the scope and dimensions of vaccine hesitancy and resistance to enhance COVID-19 vaccination in Black communities. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, pp. 1–14.

Quinn, S. C., Hilyard, K. M., Jamison, A. M., Ann, J., Hancock, G. R., Musa, D., & Freimuth, V. S. (2017). The influence of social norms on flu vaccination among African American and White adults. Health education research, 32(6), 473–486.

Wagner, C. E., Prentice, J. A., Saad-Roy, C. M., Yang, L., Grenfell, B. T., Levin, S. A., & Laxminarayan, R. (2020). Economic and behavioral influencers of vaccination and antimicrobial use. Frontiers in Public Health, pp. 8, 975.

Woko, C., Siegel, L., & Hornik, R. (2020). An investigation of low COVID-19 vaccination intentions among Black Americans: The role of behavioral beliefs and trust in COVID-19 information sources. Journal of Health Communication, 25(10), 819-826.